Effect of damaged concrete cover on the behavior of corroded concrete beams repaired with CFRP sheets

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28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites are being increasingly considered for use in civil infrastructure. These materials have found the maximum current use as materials for rapid and cost-effective rehabilitation (retrofit, repair and strengthening) of deteriorating and under-strength structural concrete components. This paper presents the experimental results of damaged/repaired reinforced concrete (RC) beams. The experimental program consisted of RC rectangular beam specimens exposed to accelerated corrosion. The corrosion rate was varied from 5% to 15% which represents loss in cross-sectional area of the steel reinforcement in the tension side. Half of the damaged beams were repaired by bonding Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) sheets to the tension side to restore the strength loss due to corrosion. The other half of the beams was first cleaned by removing spalled concrete cover and rusted bars were thoroughly cleaned. A new layer of concrete was cast to replace the removed spalled concrete cover. Then the CFRP sheets were attached to the new concrete layer. Corroded beams showed lower stiffness and strength than control (uncorroded) beams. Strength of damaged beams due to corrosion was restored to the undamaged state when repaired with CFRP sheets for all repaired beams, but the stiffness was almost unchanged. However, the repaired beams with replaced concrete cover layer resisted higher loads on average of 13% compared to damaged beams repaired without replacing the concrete cover layer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1775-1786
Number of pages12
JournalComposite Structures
Volume93
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Carbon fibers
Polymers
Concretes
Corrosion
Reinforced concrete
Stiffness
Polymer matrix composites
Steel
Strengthening (metal)
carbon fiber
Corrosion rate
Patient rehabilitation
Reinforcement
Repair
Fibers
Costs

Keywords

  • Advanced composite materials
  • CFRP sheets
  • Corrosion
  • Rehabilitation
  • Retrofitting
  • Strengthening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Ceramics and Composites

Cite this

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abstract = "Fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites are being increasingly considered for use in civil infrastructure. These materials have found the maximum current use as materials for rapid and cost-effective rehabilitation (retrofit, repair and strengthening) of deteriorating and under-strength structural concrete components. This paper presents the experimental results of damaged/repaired reinforced concrete (RC) beams. The experimental program consisted of RC rectangular beam specimens exposed to accelerated corrosion. The corrosion rate was varied from 5{\%} to 15{\%} which represents loss in cross-sectional area of the steel reinforcement in the tension side. Half of the damaged beams were repaired by bonding Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) sheets to the tension side to restore the strength loss due to corrosion. The other half of the beams was first cleaned by removing spalled concrete cover and rusted bars were thoroughly cleaned. A new layer of concrete was cast to replace the removed spalled concrete cover. Then the CFRP sheets were attached to the new concrete layer. Corroded beams showed lower stiffness and strength than control (uncorroded) beams. Strength of damaged beams due to corrosion was restored to the undamaged state when repaired with CFRP sheets for all repaired beams, but the stiffness was almost unchanged. However, the repaired beams with replaced concrete cover layer resisted higher loads on average of 13{\%} compared to damaged beams repaired without replacing the concrete cover layer.",
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AB - Fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites are being increasingly considered for use in civil infrastructure. These materials have found the maximum current use as materials for rapid and cost-effective rehabilitation (retrofit, repair and strengthening) of deteriorating and under-strength structural concrete components. This paper presents the experimental results of damaged/repaired reinforced concrete (RC) beams. The experimental program consisted of RC rectangular beam specimens exposed to accelerated corrosion. The corrosion rate was varied from 5% to 15% which represents loss in cross-sectional area of the steel reinforcement in the tension side. Half of the damaged beams were repaired by bonding Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) sheets to the tension side to restore the strength loss due to corrosion. The other half of the beams was first cleaned by removing spalled concrete cover and rusted bars were thoroughly cleaned. A new layer of concrete was cast to replace the removed spalled concrete cover. Then the CFRP sheets were attached to the new concrete layer. Corroded beams showed lower stiffness and strength than control (uncorroded) beams. Strength of damaged beams due to corrosion was restored to the undamaged state when repaired with CFRP sheets for all repaired beams, but the stiffness was almost unchanged. However, the repaired beams with replaced concrete cover layer resisted higher loads on average of 13% compared to damaged beams repaired without replacing the concrete cover layer.

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