Effect of cooking on soluble and insoluble oxalate contents in selected Pakistani vegetables and beans

Muhammad Shoaib Akhtar, Beenish Israr, Nighat Bhatty, Amanat Ali

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study evaluated the effects of cooking on the total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents in six different types of locally consumed vegetables and beans (spinach, carrots, beet root, white bean, red bean and soybean). The foods were cooked in water until they reached the soft consistency (12-15 min for vegetable and 2 h for beans). The raw and cooked samples were analyzed for their soluble and insoluble oxalate contents using the HPLC techniques. The total oxalate content of raw spinach, carrot, beet root, white bean, red bean and soybean, were found to be 978 ± 5, 49 ± 7, 67 ± 12, 158 ± 16, 113 ± 15, and 497 ± 22 mg/100 g of fresh weight respectively. The total oxalate contents of these foods after boiling were 477 ± 8, 16 ± 9, 52 ± 14, 47 ± 17, 72 ± 17, and 224 ± 25 mg/100 g of fresh weight respectively. The results showed that boiling significantly (P <0.05) reduced both soluble and insoluble oxalate contents. More losses were observed in the soluble than the insoluble oxalates. The reduction in soluble oxalate in different vegetables ranged from 16 to 66% whereas in beans ranged from 40 to 77%. The data suggests that the use of boiled vegetables can be an effective strategy for reducing the dietary intake of oxalates in individuals predisposed to the development of kidney stones.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-249
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Food Properties
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Beans
  • Boiling
  • Cooking
  • Oxalate
  • Raw
  • Vegetables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of cooking on soluble and insoluble oxalate contents in selected Pakistani vegetables and beans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this