Does swimming exercise affect experimental chronic kidney disease in rats treated with gum acacia?

Badreldin H. Ali, Suhail Al-Salam, Mohammed Al Za'abi, Khalid A. Al Balushi, Aishwarya Ramkumar, Mostafa I. Waly, Javid Yasin, Sirin A. Adham, Abderrahim Nemmar

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine -induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere102528
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 21 2014

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Gum Arabic
gum arabic
kidney diseases
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Rats
exercise
rats
Adenine
adenine
Dietary supplements
Histology
Swimming
Dietary Supplements
Drinking Water
histopathology
histology
drinking water
dietary supplements
kidneys
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Does swimming exercise affect experimental chronic kidney disease in rats treated with gum acacia? / Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A.; Nemmar, Abderrahim.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 7, e102528, 21.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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