Diagnostic accuracy of the American Diabetes Association criteria in the diagnosis of glucose intolerance among high-risk Omani subjects

Ali Ihsan Al-Bahrani, Bukhiet Charles, Bayoumi Raid, Said Ali Al-Yahyaee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent in the rapidly growing Omani population. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended new criteria for Type 2 diabetes, but the new criteria have been challenged as inadequate. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of the ADA criteria compared with World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of abnormal glucose intolerance in Omani subjects. Methods: Subjects not known to have diabetes were recruited from the Lipid and Endocrine Clinics at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 1999 and 2001. Fasting and 2-hour post-75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glucose levels were measured according to WHO criteria. Results: 176 subjects were recruited for the study. WHO and the ADA criteria were in agreement for 104 out of 115 normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 4 out of 38 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 14 out of 23 diabetic tolerance glucose (DGT) corresponding to a sensitivity of 90%, 10%, and 61% for NGT, IGT, and DGT, respectively. Compared with WHO criteria, the ADA criteria had 30% sensitivity and 90% specificity overall. Comparing fasting glucose cutoff values for the diagnosis of IGT, a cut-off of 5.9 mmol/L yielded the best diagnostic sensitivity and specificity compared to the 6.1 mmol/L recommended by the ADA criteria as determined by the receiver-operating characteristics (ROC), with an area under the curve of 0.677 vs. 0.387, respectively. Conclusion: The ADA criteria had poor sensitivity in the detection of impaired glucose tolerance in high-risk Omani subjects compared with WHO criteria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-185
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of Saudi Medicine
Volume24
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - May 2004

Fingerprint

Glucose Intolerance
Glucose
Sensitivity and Specificity
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Fasting
Glucose Tolerance Test
ROC Curve
Area Under Curve
Lipids
Population

Keywords

  • Glucose intolerance
  • Oman
  • Sensitivity and specificity
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Diagnostic accuracy of the American Diabetes Association criteria in the diagnosis of glucose intolerance among high-risk Omani subjects. / Al-Bahrani, Ali Ihsan; Charles, Bukhiet; Raid, Bayoumi; Al-Yahyaee, Said Ali.

In: Annals of Saudi Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 3, 05.2004, p. 183-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{dccae7d853784f09bf0176176bd066ea,
title = "Diagnostic accuracy of the American Diabetes Association criteria in the diagnosis of glucose intolerance among high-risk Omani subjects",
abstract = "Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent in the rapidly growing Omani population. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended new criteria for Type 2 diabetes, but the new criteria have been challenged as inadequate. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of the ADA criteria compared with World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of abnormal glucose intolerance in Omani subjects. Methods: Subjects not known to have diabetes were recruited from the Lipid and Endocrine Clinics at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 1999 and 2001. Fasting and 2-hour post-75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glucose levels were measured according to WHO criteria. Results: 176 subjects were recruited for the study. WHO and the ADA criteria were in agreement for 104 out of 115 normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 4 out of 38 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 14 out of 23 diabetic tolerance glucose (DGT) corresponding to a sensitivity of 90{\%}, 10{\%}, and 61{\%} for NGT, IGT, and DGT, respectively. Compared with WHO criteria, the ADA criteria had 30{\%} sensitivity and 90{\%} specificity overall. Comparing fasting glucose cutoff values for the diagnosis of IGT, a cut-off of 5.9 mmol/L yielded the best diagnostic sensitivity and specificity compared to the 6.1 mmol/L recommended by the ADA criteria as determined by the receiver-operating characteristics (ROC), with an area under the curve of 0.677 vs. 0.387, respectively. Conclusion: The ADA criteria had poor sensitivity in the detection of impaired glucose tolerance in high-risk Omani subjects compared with WHO criteria.",
keywords = "Glucose intolerance, Oman, Sensitivity and specificity, Type 2 diabetes mellitus",
author = "Al-Bahrani, {Ali Ihsan} and Bukhiet Charles and Bayoumi Raid and Al-Yahyaee, {Said Ali}",
year = "2004",
month = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "183--185",
journal = "Annals of Saudi Medicine",
issn = "0256-4947",
publisher = "Medknow Publications and Media Pvt. Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diagnostic accuracy of the American Diabetes Association criteria in the diagnosis of glucose intolerance among high-risk Omani subjects

AU - Al-Bahrani, Ali Ihsan

AU - Charles, Bukhiet

AU - Raid, Bayoumi

AU - Al-Yahyaee, Said Ali

PY - 2004/5

Y1 - 2004/5

N2 - Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent in the rapidly growing Omani population. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended new criteria for Type 2 diabetes, but the new criteria have been challenged as inadequate. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of the ADA criteria compared with World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of abnormal glucose intolerance in Omani subjects. Methods: Subjects not known to have diabetes were recruited from the Lipid and Endocrine Clinics at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 1999 and 2001. Fasting and 2-hour post-75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glucose levels were measured according to WHO criteria. Results: 176 subjects were recruited for the study. WHO and the ADA criteria were in agreement for 104 out of 115 normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 4 out of 38 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 14 out of 23 diabetic tolerance glucose (DGT) corresponding to a sensitivity of 90%, 10%, and 61% for NGT, IGT, and DGT, respectively. Compared with WHO criteria, the ADA criteria had 30% sensitivity and 90% specificity overall. Comparing fasting glucose cutoff values for the diagnosis of IGT, a cut-off of 5.9 mmol/L yielded the best diagnostic sensitivity and specificity compared to the 6.1 mmol/L recommended by the ADA criteria as determined by the receiver-operating characteristics (ROC), with an area under the curve of 0.677 vs. 0.387, respectively. Conclusion: The ADA criteria had poor sensitivity in the detection of impaired glucose tolerance in high-risk Omani subjects compared with WHO criteria.

AB - Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent in the rapidly growing Omani population. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended new criteria for Type 2 diabetes, but the new criteria have been challenged as inadequate. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of the ADA criteria compared with World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of abnormal glucose intolerance in Omani subjects. Methods: Subjects not known to have diabetes were recruited from the Lipid and Endocrine Clinics at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 1999 and 2001. Fasting and 2-hour post-75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glucose levels were measured according to WHO criteria. Results: 176 subjects were recruited for the study. WHO and the ADA criteria were in agreement for 104 out of 115 normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 4 out of 38 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 14 out of 23 diabetic tolerance glucose (DGT) corresponding to a sensitivity of 90%, 10%, and 61% for NGT, IGT, and DGT, respectively. Compared with WHO criteria, the ADA criteria had 30% sensitivity and 90% specificity overall. Comparing fasting glucose cutoff values for the diagnosis of IGT, a cut-off of 5.9 mmol/L yielded the best diagnostic sensitivity and specificity compared to the 6.1 mmol/L recommended by the ADA criteria as determined by the receiver-operating characteristics (ROC), with an area under the curve of 0.677 vs. 0.387, respectively. Conclusion: The ADA criteria had poor sensitivity in the detection of impaired glucose tolerance in high-risk Omani subjects compared with WHO criteria.

KW - Glucose intolerance

KW - Oman

KW - Sensitivity and specificity

KW - Type 2 diabetes mellitus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=3142709613&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=3142709613&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 15307455

AN - SCOPUS:3142709613

VL - 24

SP - 183

EP - 185

JO - Annals of Saudi Medicine

JF - Annals of Saudi Medicine

SN - 0256-4947

IS - 3

ER -