D-dot probe for fast-front high-voltage measurement

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents the operating principle, design, and testing of a coaxial D-dot (the time derivative of electric flux density) probe to measure fast-front high voltages, e.g., the residual voltages of surge arresters (SAs). This probe consists of three identical copper toroids placed around a high-voltage electrode, where all are coaxially assembled in a large earthed cylinder. The probe was first simulated by a finite-element package to optimize the assembly and reduce the electric field inside it. This was confirmed by an alternating current test to ensure a corona-free design. Simultaneous impulse voltage measurements were done using the designed D-dot probe-two commercial mixed resistivecapacitive (RC) probes and a damped capacitive voltage divider. The linearity of the D-dot probe was checked under unloaded and loaded conditions. Results reveal that the larger the toroid separation and/or the lower the attenuator capacitance is, the higher the measured voltage from the middle "signal" toroid will be. The residual voltage waveforms for an 11-kV SA, measured by two commercial mixed RC probes and the damped capacitive voltage divider, showed an initial inductive overshoot superimposed on the waveform and a significant decay, even before the current peak instant. On the contrary, the voltage measured by the designed D -dot probe gave a voltage waveform that looked like that of the current and slightly led the latter. For the damped capacitive voltage divider and the two commercial mixed RC probes, neither the peak voltage nor the voltage at peak current gave the correct currentvoltage characteristics. This confirms the contradiction of some published SA models in the high-conduction regime because most models were based on measurements done by different and large-impulse capacitive or resistive voltage dividers with improper compensation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5286212
Pages (from-to)2211-2219
Number of pages9
JournalIEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement
Volume59
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Voltage measurement
electrical measurement
high voltages
Voltage dividers
probes
Electric potential
electric potential
arresters
dividers
toroids
waveforms
impulses
attenuators
Capacitance
coronas
Electric fields
linearity
Fluxes
alternating current
Derivatives

Keywords

  • D-dot probes
  • electric field sensors
  • fast-front voltages
  • impulse voltage measurement
  • surge arresters (SAs)
  • voltage dividers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

D-dot probe for fast-front high-voltage measurement. / Metwally, Ibrahim A.

In: IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, Vol. 59, No. 8, 5286212, 08.2010, p. 2211-2219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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