Current scenario of catalysts for biodiesel production: A critical review

Farrukh Jamil, Lamya Al-Haj, Ala'a H. Al-Muhtaseb, Mohab A. Al-Hinai, Mahad Baawain, Umer Rashid, Mohammad N.M. Ahmad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to increasing concerns about global warming and dwindling oil supplies, the world's attention is turning to green processes that use sustainable and environmentally friendly feedstock to produce renewable energy such as biofuels. Among them, biodiesel, which is made from nontoxic, biodegradable, renewable sources such as refined and used vegetable oils and animal fats, is a renewable substitute fuel for petroleum diesel fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification in which oil or fat is reacted with short chain alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. The process of transesterification is affected by the mode of reaction, molar ratio of alcohol to oil, type of alcohol, nature and amount of catalysts, reaction time, and temperature. Various studies have been carried out using different oils as the raw material; different alcohols (methanol, ethanol, butanol); different catalysts; notably homogeneous catalysts such as sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, and supercritical fluids; or, in some cases, enzymes such as lipases. This article focuses on the application of heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production because of their environmental and economic advantages. This review contains a detailed discussion on the advantages and feasibility of catalysts for biodiesel production, which are both environmentally and economically viable as compared to conventional homogeneous catalysts. The classification of catalysts into different categories based on a catalyst's activity, feasibility, and lifetime is also briefly discussed. Furthermore, recommendations have been made for the most suitable catalyst (bifunctional catalyst) for low-cost oils to valuable biodiesel and the challenges faced by the biodiesel industry with some possible solutions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalUnknown Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Mar 22 2017

Fingerprint

Biofuels
Biodiesel
Catalysts
Oils
Alcohols
Transesterification
Oils and fats
Fats
Potassium hydroxide
Sodium Hydroxide
Butanols
Supercritical fluids
Plant Oils
Vegetable oils
Petroleum
Lipases
Global warming
Diesel fuels
Lipase
Butenes

Keywords

  • bifunctional catalysts
  • biodiesel
  • esterification
  • heterogeneous catalysts
  • transesterification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Current scenario of catalysts for biodiesel production : A critical review. / Jamil, Farrukh; Al-Haj, Lamya; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala'a H.; Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Baawain, Mahad; Rashid, Umer; Ahmad, Mohammad N.M.

In: Unknown Journal, 22.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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