Comparative audit of clinical research in pediatric neurology

Amna Al-Futaisi, Michael Shevell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical research involves direct observation or data collection on human subjects. This study was conducted to evaluate the profile of pediatric neurology clinical research over a decade. Trends in pediatric neurology clinical research were documented through a systematic comparative review of articles published in selected journals. Eleven journals (five pediatric neurology, three general neurology, three general pediatrics) were systematically reviewed for articles involving a majority of human subjects less than 18 years of age for the years 1990 and 2000. Three hundred thirty-five clinical research articles in pediatric neurology were identified in the 11 journals for 1990 and 398 for 2000, a 19% increase. A statistically significant increase in analytic design (21.8% vs 39.5%; P = .01), statistical support (6% vs 16.6%; P < .0001), and multidisciplinary team (69.9% vs 87%; P = .003) was observed. In terms of specific study design, a significant decline in case reports (34.3% vs 10.3%; P < .0001) and an increase in case-control studies (11.3% vs 22.9%; P = .02) were evident over the 10-year interval. This comparative audit revealed that there has been a discernible change in the methodology profile of clinical research in child neurology over a decade. Trends apparently suggest a more rigorous approach to study design and investigation in this field.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)882-886
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume19
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2004

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Clinical Audit
Neurology
Pediatrics
Research
Case-Control Studies
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Comparative audit of clinical research in pediatric neurology. / Al-Futaisi, Amna; Shevell, Michael.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 19, No. 11, 11.2004, p. 882-886.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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