Cognitive behaviour modification: A technique for teaching subtraction skills to hearing and deaf/hard-of-hearing elementary students

Y. A. Al-Hilawani*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of using the Cognitive Behaviour Modification (CBM) technique on the subtraction skills of third grade hearing and deaf/hard-of-hearing students. The results indicated that the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students and the CBM and non-CBM hearing students made more progress in solving the subtraction problems than the non-CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students. The results also showed that there were no significant differences between the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing and the non-CBM hearing students; and there were no significant differences between the CBM and non-CBM hearing students. The results revealed that the CBM hearing students achieved significantly higher post-test scores than the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students. However, the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students obtained a significantly higher gain score compared to the CBM and non-CBM hearing students. Implications for teachers and suggestions for future research are discussed in this paper. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-225
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Rehabilitation Research
Volume23
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Cognitive behaviour modification
  • Deafness
  • Hard-of-hearing
  • Teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)

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