Cesarean section in morbidly obese parturients

Practical implications and complications

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of obesity has reached pandemic proportions across nations. Morbid obesity has a dramatic impact on pregnancy outcome. Cesarean section in these women poses many surgical, anesthetic, and logistical challenges. In view of the increased risk of cesarean delivery in morbidly obese women, the practical implications and complications are reviewed in this article. A Medline search was conducted to review the recent relevant articles in english literature on cesarean section in morbidly obese women. The types of incisions and techniques used during cesarean delivery, intra-operative and postpartum complications, anesthetic and logistical issues, maternal morbidity and mortality were reviewed. Morbidly obese women with a body mass index (BMI >40 kg/m 2 are at increased risk of pregnancy complications and a significantly increased rate of cesarean delivery. Low transverse skin incisions and transverse uterine incisions are definitely superior and must be the first option. Closure of the subcutaneous layer is recommended, but the placement of subcutaneous drains remains controversial. Thromboprophylaxis adjusted to body weight and prophylactic antibiotics help in reducing postpartum morbidity. Morbidly obese women are at increased risk of postpartum infectious morbidity. Weight reduction in the postpartum period and thereafter must be strongly encouraged for optimal future pregnancy outcomes and well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-18
Number of pages6
JournalNorth American Journal of Medical Sciences
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Cesarean Section
Postpartum Period
Parturition
Pregnancy Outcome
Morbidity
Anesthetics
Morbid Obesity
Pregnancy Complications
Maternal Mortality
Pandemics
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Body Weight
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Skin

Keywords

  • Anesthesia
  • Cesarean section
  • Morbid obesity
  • Postoperative complications
  • Postpartum morbidity
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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