Assessment of what the consumer values in fresh fruit quality: Case study of Oman

Linus U. Opara, Fahad A. Al-Said, Aamna Al-Abri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The health and nutritional benefits of fruit consumption are well documented in the scientific literature. Understanding consumer perceptions and attitudes towards fruit quality is important in setting quality specifications for marketing as well as providing a useful guide for postharvest research aimed at quality improvement of fresh produce. In this study, we investigated the frequency of fruit consumption and consumer perceptions of fruit quality in the Sultanate of Oman using self-administered questionnaires. Results obtained showed that the frequency of fruit consumption was higher among males and families with high incomes. Banana was the most preferred fruit eaten by consumers whereas apple was the least preferred. Among the five types of fruit examined in the study, the most influential quality attributes affecting consumer purchase were flavour, sweetness, and colour for banana (Musa acuminata) and date (Phoenix dactylifera), and flavour, sweetness, and firmness for apple (Malus domestica), mango (Magnifera indica), and orange (Citrus sinensis). The most common fruit quality problems frequently observed by consumers in the market were fruit immaturity (banana), bruising (apple), rots/decay (mango and orange), and bad taste (date). A large majority of consumers (38%) expressed a willingness to pay up to 25% more on unit price for guaranteed good quality fruit; however, increasing price by more than 50% was highly unacceptable to 94% of consumers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-243
Number of pages9
JournalNew Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • Acceptability
  • Consumer preference
  • Fruit
  • Post-purchase losses
  • Produce origin
  • Quality attributes
  • Sultanate of Oman
  • Willingness to pay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Horticulture

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