Analysis of temperature in conventional and ultrasonically-assisted drilling of cortical bone with infrared thermography

K. Alam, Vadim V. Silberschmidt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Bone drilling is widely used in orthopaedics, dental and neurosurgeries for repair and fixation purposes. One of the major concerns in drilling of bone is thermal necrosis that may seriously affect healing at interfaces with fixtures and implants. Ultrasonically-assisted drilling (UAD) is recently introduced as alternative to conventional drilling (CD) to minimize invasiveness of the procedure. OBJECTIVE: This paper studies temperature rise in bovine cortical bone drilled with CD and UAD techniques and their comparison using infrared thermography. METHODS: A parametric investigation was carried out to evaluate effects of drilling conditions (drilling speed and feed rate) and parameters of ultrasonic vibration (frequency and amplitude) on the temperature elevation in bone. RESULTS: Higher levels of the drilling speed and feed rate were found responsible for generating temperatures above a thermal threshold level in both types of drilling. UAD with frequency below 20 kHz resulted in lower temperature compared to CD with the same drilling parameters. The temperatures generated in cases with vibration frequency exceeding 20 kHz were significantly higher than those in CD for the range of drilling speeds and feed rates. The amplitude of vibration was found to have no significant effect on bone temperature. CONCLUSIONS: UAD may be investigated further to explore its benefits over the existing CD techniques.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-252
Number of pages10
JournalTechnology and Health Care
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Drilling
Bone
Temperature
Bone and Bones
Vibration
Hot Temperature
Neurosurgery
Vibrations (mechanical)
Orthopedics
Cortical Bone
Tooth
Necrosis
Repair
Ultrasonics

Keywords

  • Bone drilling
  • infrared thermography
  • orthopaedic
  • thermal necrosis
  • ultrasonically-assisted drilling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Information Systems
  • Health Informatics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Analysis of temperature in conventional and ultrasonically-assisted drilling of cortical bone with infrared thermography. / Alam, K.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

In: Technology and Health Care, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2014, p. 243-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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