A quantitative risk assessment of waterborne infectious disease in the inundation area of a tropical monsoon region

So Kazama, Toshiki Aizawa, Toru Watanabe, Priyantha Ranjan, Luminda Gunawardhana, Ayako Amano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Flooding and inundation are annual events that occur during the rainy season in Cambodia, and inundation has a strong relationship with human health. This study simulated the coliform bacteria distribution using a hydraulic model and estimated the impact of inundation on public health using a dose-response model. The model parameters were calibrated using field survey data from Cambodia and obtained good agreement with the coliform group count distribution. The results suggest that the impact of inundation on human health is most noticeable in residential areas. The annual average risk of infection during medium-sized flood events is 0.21. The risk due to groundwater use ranges from 0.12 to 0.17 in inundation areas and reaches as high as 0.23 outside the inundation areas. The risk attributed to groundwater use is therefore higher than that for surface water use (0. 02-0. 06), except in densely populated areas at the city center. There is a high risk for infection with waterborne disease in residential areas, and the annual average risk during small flood events is 0. 94. An assessment of possible countermeasures to reduce the risk shows that the control of inundation may bring more risk to public health in Cambodia. Shallower inundation water (

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-54
Number of pages10
JournalSustainability Science
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

waterborne disease
infectious disease
risk assessment
contagious disease
Communicable Diseases
monsoon
Cambodia
residential area
Groundwater
public health
event
natural disaster
Public Health
water
coliform bacterium
groundwater
Water
Health
Infection
Waterborne Diseases

Keywords

  • Concentration of coliform bacteria
  • Dose-response model
  • Hydrological model
  • The Mekong River

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health(social science)
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Ecology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Global and Planetary Change

Cite this

A quantitative risk assessment of waterborne infectious disease in the inundation area of a tropical monsoon region. / Kazama, So; Aizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Toru; Ranjan, Priyantha; Gunawardhana, Luminda; Amano, Ayako.

In: Sustainability Science, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 45-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kazama, So ; Aizawa, Toshiki ; Watanabe, Toru ; Ranjan, Priyantha ; Gunawardhana, Luminda ; Amano, Ayako. / A quantitative risk assessment of waterborne infectious disease in the inundation area of a tropical monsoon region. In: Sustainability Science. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 45-54.
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